admission


admission
[[t]ædmɪ̱ʃ(ə)n[/t]]
admissions
1) N-VAR: oft N to n Admission is permission given to a person to enter a place, or permission given to a country to enter an organization. Admission is also the act of entering a place.

Students apply for admission to a particular college...

Poland and Czechoslovakia have vigorously pursued admission to the European Community...

There have been substantial increases in hospital admissions of children.

Syn:
2) N-PLURAL: oft N n Admissions to a place such as a school or university are the people who are allowed to enter or join it.

Each school sets its own admissions policy.

3) N-UNCOUNT Admission at a park, museum, or other place is the amount of money that you pay to enter it.

Gates open at 10.30am and admission is free.

Syn:
N-UNCOUNT: N n
Admission is also used before a noun.

The admission price is $8 for adults.

4) N-VAR: oft N of n, N that An admission is a statement that something bad, unpleasant, or embarrassing is true.

By his own admission, he is not playing well...

She wanted some admission of guilt from her father.


English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • admission — [ admisjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1539; lat. admissio 1 ♦ Action d admettre (qqn), fait d être admis. J ai envoyé au président du club ma demande d admission. Admission dans une école, à un examen. Admission sur concours. 2 ♦ (XVIII e) Action d admettre en… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • admission — ad·mis·sion n 1: the act or process of admitting admission into evidence 2 a: a party s acknowledgment that a fact or statement is true ◇ In civil cases admissions are often agreed to and offered in writing to the court before trial as a method… …   Law dictionary

  • admission — or admission to trading Admission to trading on the Exchange s markets for listed securities and admitted and traded shall be construed accordingly. For the avoidance of doubt this does not include when issued dealings . London Stock Exchange… …   Financial and business terms

  • ADMISSION — ADMISSION, legal concept applying both to debts and facts. Formal admission by a defendant is regarded as equal to the evidence of a hundred witnesses (BM 3b). This admission had to be a formal one, before duly appointed witnesses, or before the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Admission — Ad*mis sion, n. [L. admissio: cf. F. admission. See {Admit}.] 1. The act or practice of admitting. [1913 Webster] 2. Power or permission to enter; admittance; entrance; access; power to approach. [1913 Webster] What numbers groan for sad… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • admission — admission, admittance Like many doublets, these two words have competed with each other for several centuries (admission first recorded in Middle English, admittance in 1589) without ever establishing totally separate roles. In the meaning… …   Modern English usage

  • admission — temporaire. Admission of goods into country duty free for processing and eventual export. Bail. The order of a competent court or magistrate that a person accused of crime be discharged from actual custody upon the taking of bail. Evidence.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • admission — temporaire. Admission of goods into country duty free for processing and eventual export. Bail. The order of a competent court or magistrate that a person accused of crime be discharged from actual custody upon the taking of bail. Evidence.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • Admission — may refer to several things:In general usage* *Allowance into a theater, movie theater, music venue, or other event locale, especially when purchased with a ticketIn education*University and college admissionsIn law*Admission (law), a statement… …   Wikipedia

  • admission — ADMISSION. sub. fém. Action par laquelle on est admis. Depuis son admission aux Ordres sacrés, il a toujours vécu en bon Ecclésiastique …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • admission — (n.) early 15c., acceptance, reception, approval, from L. admissionem (nom. admissio) a letting in, noun of action from pp. stem of admittere (see ADMIT (Cf. admit)). Meaning an acknowledging is from 1530s. Sense of a literal act of letting in is …   Etymology dictionary